1968: We Were There

@ Co-Prosperity Sphere

Tuesday, October 16 ~~ 7PM

MAKE Literary Production’s 5th annual Lit & Luz Festival of Language, Literature, and Art, themed "Assembly," is an ambitious exchange between Mexico City and Chicago. The weeklong festival takes place at over a dozen arts venues and universities throughout Chicago, October 13th-20th. The following March, a similar series of events are held in Mexico City. Programs include readings, conversations, and our signature event, the “Live Magazine Show”—which makes its Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago debut this year. #litluz / www.litluz.org

Main Facebook event page:
http://bit.ly/LLFBMain
_______________________________________________________

1968: We Were There

On this 50th anniversary, writers and activists assembled by Lit & Luz’s Dr. Héctor García Chávez and Moira Pujols of Contratiempo discuss what testimony in literature, including Massacre in Mexico by Elena Poniatowska and No One Was Killed: The Democratic National Convention, August 1968 by John Schulz, means to the tumultuous events that transpired in Chicago and Mexico City in 1968—and why the student revolt in Mexico City is largely under discussed in the US.

Featuring: Randall Albers, Carlos Arango, Bill Ayers, and Nicole Marroquin

ABOUT THE PARTICIPANTS

Randall Albers, Professor and Chair Emeritus at Columbia College Chicago, chaired the Fiction Writing Department, and founded the long-running Story Week Festival of Writers. His work has appeared in Prairie Schooner, Chicago Review, TriQuarterly, Writers Digest, Writing in Education, Brevity,F Magazine, and Briefly Knocked Unconscious by a Low-Flying Duck, among others. With Steve May, he authored the lead article in Creative Writing and Education, edited by Graeme Harper; and two chapters from his novel-in-progress, All the World Before Them, set during the Vietnam War, were nominated for Pushcart Prizes. He teaches in Rome for Columbia College.

Randall Albers, profesor y catedrático emérito del Columbia College Chicago, presidió el Departamento de Escritura de Ficción y fundó el Story Week Festival of Writers. Su trabajo ha aparecido en Prairie Schooner, Chicago Review, TriQuarterly, Writers Digest, Writing in Education, Brevity, F Magazine y Briefly Knocked Unconscious by a Low-Flying Duck, entre otros. Con Steve May, fue el autor del artículo principal en Creative Writing and Education, editado por Graeme Harper; y dos capítulos de su novela en curso, All the World Before Them, ambientada durante la guerra de Vietnam, fueron nominados para los premios Pushcart. Enseña en Roma para el Columbia College.

William Ayers has written extensively about social justice, democracy, and education as an essentially intellectual, ethical, and political enterprise. His books include Teaching Toward Freedom; Fugitive Days: A Memoir; Public Enemy: Confessions of an American Dissident; Race Course: Against White Supremacy; and Demand the Impossible! A Radical Manifesto.

William Ayers ha escrito extensamente sobre la justicia social, la democracia y la educación como una entidad esencialmente intelectual, ética y política. Sus libros incluyen Teaching Toward Freedom; Fugitive Days: A Memoir; Public Enemy: Confessions of an American Dissident; Race Course: Against White Supremacy; y Demand the Impossible! A Radical Manifesto.

Nicole Marroquin is an interdisciplinary artist, researcher, activist and teacher educator whose current research looks at Chicago school uprisings between 1967–74. She has recently presented projects at the New School, the Newberry Library, Harold Washington Public Library, DePaul Museum of Art, Glass Curtain Gallery, Hull House Museum and Northwestern University. She received the Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz Women of Excellence Award in 2011 for her work in her community. She received an MFA from the University of Michigan in 2008 and is Associate Professor in the Department of Art Education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Nicole Marroquin es una artista interdisciplinaria, investigadora, activista y formadora de maestros cuya investigación actual analiza los levantamientos escolares de Chicago entre 1967 y 1974. Recientemente ha presentado proyectos en la New School, Newberry Library, Harold Washington Public Library, DePaul Museum of Art, Glass Curtain Gallery, Hull House Museum y la Universidad Northwestern en Illinois. Recibió el Premio Mujer de Excelencia Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz en 2011 por su trabajo en su comunidad. Recibió un MFA de la Universidad de Michigan en 2008 y es Profesora Asociada en el Departamento de Educación Artística de la Escuela del Instituto de Arte de Chicago.